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Real Estate Talk:
Income property / 8

A look at tenants’ obligations

By Joseph Marovitch

A note of discretion before starting this article. Last week I discussed the obligations of the landlord and in this article, I will discuss the tenant’s obligations, however I would advise both tenants and landlords to vet one another carefully with credit checks and references before signing a lease. Finding out that your new tenant is very difficult to deal with and vis à vis the landlord as well, can make for a very difficult situation to deal with. There are ways to avoid problems by checking references, obtaining credit checks and owning income properties in more affluent areas of town. For more information on vetting and avoiding headaches, check with the Régie du logement or contact me.

… I would advise both tenants and landlords to vet one another carefully with credit checks and references before signing a lease.

Tenant’s obligations

You have received a letter from your landlord requesting you pay your late rent by a specific date, and that the landlord has opened a file with the Régie du logement, which would and should be done within days of the landlord not receiving the rent.

What are your rights and obligations? Some of the apparent obligations of the tenant are stated in the signed lease. Others can be found on-line or by calling the Régie du logement.

The basic obligations of the tenant are as follows:
– Pay the rent as stated in the signed lease, on the day the rent is due according to the lease
– Maintain the unit responsibly
– Perform minor repairs as required
– Do not change the form of the unit without written permission form the landlord
– Do not disturb other tenants
– When vacating the unit, ensure the unit is in the same condition as you took possession of the unit

Paying the rent

It is stated in the lease when the rent is due each month, and it is the obligation of the tenant to pay the rent on or before that date. If the rent is even one day late, normal protocol would require the landlord to contact the Régie du logement and open a file. The Régie would advise the landlord to send a registered letter to the tenant, requesting the tenant pay their rent by a specific date. Should the tenant not pay the rent by the stated date, the landlord can request that the Régie du logement cancel the lease and evict the tenant. This request to the Regie, to cancel the lease, can only be demanded once the rent is three weeks late.

‘It is stated in the lease, when the rent is due each month. It is the obligation of the tenant to pay the rent on or before that date.’

Maintain the unit responsibly

The tenant does not own the unit and therefore must not damage or make the unit un-liveable.

This means the tenant must:
– Repair any minor damage due to fault or deterioration such as small holes or burnt out light bulbs.
– Notify the landlord of any defects or major deterioration with enough time to allow repair before the issue gets worse.

It should be noted that if there is damage to the unit that is not the fault of the tenant, the landlord may pay for the issue.

Changing the units form

It is the responsibility of the tenant to return the unit as they found it upon possession, therefore any changes or additions to the unit must be removed, if the landlord insists. If the tenant requested and received written permission from the landlord to change the form by adding a wall or room, then the change would not have to be removed.

‘It is the responsibility of the tenant to return the unit as they found it upon possession, therefore any changes or additions to the unit must be removed, if the landlord insists.’

Changing the use of the unit

To a degree, the use of the unit can be changed under two conditions. First is that the landlord provides written permission and secondly, if the by-laws of the municipality allow the change.

For example, a tenant might use the basement for an office.

Not disturbing other tenants

All tenants have the right to enjoy the use of their units in peace. Therefore, it is the obligation of each tenant to ensure they do not disturb the neighbours by being excessively loud or obnoxious. Tenants who are allowed to have dogs, cannot allow their dogs to roam freely or bark off the balcony. Should a tenant install a Jacuzzi in their unit and the Jacuzzi causes noise or vibration to the next tenant, the tenant must resolve the issue by purchasing a Jacuzzi that does not disturb the neighbour or get rid of the Jacuzzi.

Not allowing your neighbour to enjoy their unit in peace can result in litigation or cancellation of your lease.

‘All tenants have the right to enjoy the use of their units in peace. Therefore, it is the obligation of each tenant to ensure they do not disturb the neighbours by being excessively loud or obnoxious.’

Returning the unit at the end of the lease

It is the obligation of the tenant to return the unit as they received it. If the unit was empty, clean and had no additional walls, rooms or appliances, then this is how the unit must be left. If changes were made or items were left in the unit after the tenant vacated, causing the landlord to remove or clean the unit at a cost, the landlord has the right to collect the cash outlay from the tenant.

These are the basic obligations of the tenant, however there are many more issues that can arise. Each issue has a stated resolution but must be handled on a case-by-case basis.

For further information you can contact the Régie du logement in Montreal at 514 873-2245 or 1-800-683-2245

Next week’s topic: Régie du logement – Who are they and how to deal with them from the landlord’s perspective

Should you have questions or require further details, please feel free to contact me.

Have a great week.


State of the market

In recent months, sales of condos have been on the rise as inventory for single detached and semi-detached homes has decreased. Singles, couples, senior citizens and foreign buyers have been the main purchasers in the downtown core.

However, there is another trend arising. Many seniors have sold their homes and downsized to condos to have an easier and more mobile life. For a senior citizen, a condo means not having to worry about stairs, lawns and alarms. The condo is basically maintenance free compared to a house. Furthermore, if the condo comes with services such as 24-hour security and doorman, then the senior has full mobility for a time.

The question is, what happens when the senior citizen is no longer mobile. Many of us are living to a greater age than in the past. If you are in your eighties or nineties, your spouse has passed on, and the kids are in another city, where do you go?

In Montreal, there are more and more seniors coming of age and there is both a need and demand for good cost-effective retirement homes. Developers considered and planned for the movement towards condos. Now would be a good time to address the retirement issues.

Bouton S'inscrire à l'infolettre – WestmountMag.caImage: P Widling

Read also: Real Estate Talk: Income Property / 7


Joseph Marovitch - WestmountMag.ca

Joseph Marovitch has worked in the service industry for over 30 years. His first career was working with families from Westmount and surrounding areas, hosting children between the ages of 6 to 16 as the owner and director of Camp Maromac, a sports and arts sleep away summer camp established in 1968. Using the same strengths caring for the families, such as reliability, integrity, honesty and a deep sense of protecting the interests of those he is responsible to, Joseph applies this to his present real estate broker career. Should you have questions please feel free to contact Joseph Marovitch at 514 825-8771, or josephmarovitch@gmail.com


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