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Rev up your energy level

Low Energy Got You Down?
Learn the Chinese Way to Vitality

By Craig Cormack, BA, RMT

This article was previously published in WesountMag.ca

Like many people who suffer from low energy, you may feel that your lack of vitality stands in the way of your personal and professional achievement and enjoyment of life. And you may be looking for a natural, drug and side-effects free way to conquer your fatigue once and for all.

Doctors report that the most common complaint they receive from their patients is low energy. So you are not alone. However, too many low-energy sufferers self-medicate with sugar, alcohol, and drugs. A little knowledge about the causes of low energy — and the simple ways you can fight these causes — can go a long way towards achieving lifelong vitality, as well as personal and professional success.

Low energy: causes and remedies
Stress, poor diet, lack of exercise, and lack of refreshing sleep are the most common causes of low energy. So a mere visit to your doctor, coffee, sugar, or a few pills won’t turn things around for you.

Stress is probably the number one culprit. It depletes and debilitates you. Everyone has some stress in their lives, but some have allowed it to take over their whole being. Is it then a mystery that many people feel tired, or even angry or depressed much too often?

To conquer low energy, you must commit to managing your stress, eating a healthier diet, regular exercise and sleep.

How do you do all this? It’s simple: start slowly, one or two steps at a time. For example, start eating less meat and more fruits and vegetables. Avoid eating late at night. Eat healthy snacks during the day. Avoid sugary foods and drinks. Reduce your caffeine intake. Go for a daily walk. And go to bed early with a book or radio.

The key is not to excite or deplete your system with sugar, caffeine, or late night activities that over-stimulate your mind and body. A first step to overcoming fatigue may be as simple as preparing for sleep one or two hours in advance. Then try following nature’s cues for a few weeks. Slowly add in changes to your diet, regular exercise, a relaxing new hobby, and so forth.

The power of Tai Chi, Chi Kung and Chinese massotherapy to overcome fatigue
I’ve practiced and taught Tai Chi, Chi Kung and Chinese massotherapy for more than 15 years. During that time, I’ve helped hundreds of people heal their ailments, achieve optimum wellness, and boost their vitality.

The Chinese disciplines that I practice and teach stimulate the immune system and energize the body. They are proven tools for overcoming low energy, stress, and many other afflictions. They are ideal methods to gently and gradually increase your energy, stamina, and ability to focus.

The meditative movements and breathing exercises in Tai Chi and Chi Kung have a pedigree that stretches back thousands of years. Chinese massotherapy also boasts an equally long and noble heritage. In fact, Chinese doctors and hospitals in China use all three disciplines to heal their patients to this day.

Recent scientific studies in the West have supported what Chinese doctors have known for centuries.

For example, Tai Chi and Chi Kung have been found to help balance cortisol production in the adrenal glands, thereby reducing stress. Also, the American Diabetes Association has recently identified Chi Kung as a factor in stabilizing the energy of the body through its power to control blood sugar levels.

Take precautions, then be proactive
Of course, before starting any self-directed program to boost your energy, consult your doctor and make sure that your fatigue isn’t the effect of an undiagnosed illness. In the meantime, you can consult the Rising Tao website below for more detailed information on the healing power of Chinese medicine.

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Image: Raúl González via StockPholio.com


craig cormack

Craig Cormack, BA, RMT, is a Chi Kung master, a registered Chinese massotherapist, and a senior Tai Chi instructor based in Montreal, Canada. He is a consultant at the McGill University Health Centre and President of l’Association de massage chinois Tuina du Québec. He is also Principal at Rising Tao Integrative Health



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